Articles of our and your interest

The Teej Festival as a metaphor for the Nepalese transnational identity

Based on an experience of Dr. Arianna Borelli

The migration process represents, by definition, an opportunity for creation, reformulation, change and (re) construction. The feelings of identity and belonging do not escape this dynamic and are shaped congruently to the context in which they emerge.

The first works on the study of Migrations described a linear, unilateral and monofactorial relationship of the fenómeno migratório. Starting from the 1970s, system theories pushed migratory studies beyond its conceptual limits: the migratory space acquires three-dimensionality, migratory paths gain reciprocity and variability, and the migrant subject challenges the frontiers of nation-states by transforming into a being in national movement, trans and mute. Schiller and Basch think of transnationalism as a phenomenon of building social spaces that link the country of origin with that of destiny, describing the subjects in migration as "transmigrants". The transmigrant is a being capable of maintaining various relationships (family, economic, social, religious, political) without being hindered by national frontiers, and whose identity is worked according to the influence of the interactions with the various systems with which he is in contact. Each of the components that defines a person and / or a migrant community plays a valuable role in determining its complex identity process. The place is a central element in defining the principle of individual and social identity (Pereira, 2019, citing Augè, 2002).

The Teej Festival as a metaphor for the Nepalese transnational identity

Based on an experience of Dr. Arianna Borelli

The migration process represents, by definition, an opportunity for creation, reformulation, change and (re) construction. The feelings of identity and belonging do not escape this dynamic and are shaped congruently to the context in which they emerge.

The first works on the study of Migrations described a linear, unilateral and monofactorial relationship of the fenómeno migratório. Starting from the 1970s, system theories pushed migratory studies beyond its conceptual limits: the migratory space acquires three-dimensionality, migratory paths gain reciprocity and variability, and the migrant subject challenges the frontiers of nation-states by transforming into a being in national movement, trans and mute. Schiller and Basch think of transnationalism as a phenomenon of building social spaces that link the country of origin with that of destiny, describing the subjects in migration as "transmigrants". The transmigrant is a being capable of maintaining various relationships (family, economic, social, religious, political) without being hindered by national frontiers, and whose identity is worked according to the influence of the interactions with the various systems with which he is in contact. Each of the components that defines a person and / or a migrant community plays a valuable role in determining its complex identity process. The place is a central element in defining the principle of individual and social identity (Pereira, 2019, citing Augè, 2002).